Kassian Cephas 4

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About

Kassian Cephas (1845 – 1912) was a Javanese photographer of the court of the Yogyakarta Sultanate. He was the first indigenous person from Indonesia to become a professional photographer and was trained at the request of Sultan Hamengkubuwana VI (r. 1855–1877). After becoming a court photographer in as early 1871, he began working on portrait photography for members of the royal family, as well as documentary work for the Dutch Archaeological Union. Cephas was recognized for his contributions to preserving Java’s cultural heritage through membership in the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies and an honorary gold medal of the Order of Orange-Nassau. Cephas and his wife Dina Rakijah raised four children.

Cephas’ studio was located on the second floor of the building where he and his wife lived in Yogyakarta’s Lodji Ketjil Wetan area, now known as Major Suryotomo Street. His photography business was not the only one established in the area during this time period. Aside from portrait photography, Cephas also produced many works on buildings and ancient monuments. This included photographs of the Taman Sari Water Castle (1884) for the Royal Batavian Society of Arts and Sciences.


Works

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas

19th Century Javanese photographer Kassian Cephas